The registration and the lectures will take place in the lecture hall of psychiatry in the von Siebold-Straße 5

Workshop Neurobiology of C. elegans

The nematode C. elegans is a popular model organism, which shows many interesting behaviors. Because of its simplicity, individual genes and/or neurons can be analyzed for their impacts on certain phenotypes.   

In the workshop, the participants will learn the handling and the advantages of C. elegans. They will perform high-resolution, real-time in vivo microscopy.  Moreover, they will be introduced to functional Ca2+-imaging to measure single neuron activity, as well as to optogenetic manipulations of neuronal circuits.

Maximum number of participants is 15.

Max Planck Research Group Henrik Bringmann

Major Research Interests

Sleep states occur in the life of every animal studied. While the function of waking is obvious, the function of sleep is unknown. Sleep has been suggested a restorative function in the nervous system. Our lab is trying to understand the function and regulation of sleep by studying different model organisms. We have started our studies by looking at sleep in the larva of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and are also working with mice.

We are combining behavioral assays with genetics and functional imaging. We recently found a single sleep-inducing neuron in C. elegans that is homologous to mammalian sleep neurons. This highly simplified sleep-inducing system in a tractable genetic model provides a great starting point to understand the regulation of sleep and to manipulate sleep in order to study the function of sleep.

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Göttingen Graduate School for Neurosciences, Biophysics, and Molecular Biosciences

Henrik Bringmann

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